Tag Archives: Ken Hammill

The Sting, Guelph style

Posted August 13, 2012

First maestro, a little Scott Joplin ragtime, please.

The news that the city was seriously considering a new downtown library came from the chief librarian Kitty Pope.

At the time, she announced the cost would be $63 million plus another $10 million to outfit the new digs. Not only that, but she estimated completion by 2017. Further it was revealed that a Hamilton architectural consultant and a New York City design consultant had been hired to produce preliminary design elements of the proposed 93,000 square foot project to be built on the Baker Street parking lot.

Ms. Pope became the straw person in this exercise. Friends of Farbridge (FOB), Ken Hammill and his wife are promoting the downtown library project.

Then Council declared in its latest capital forecast that the downtown library was put aside for ten years.

In typical Farbridge fashion, the city has hired out-of-town experts to develop a comprehensive business plan for the project. It has now evolved into a public-private enterprise, complete with hi-rise condo atop the library, retail space, and underground parking to replace lost spaces on the parking lot.

See where we are going with this. First, is there no one on staff that can develop a business plan? Second, when did the library get pushed up the capital forecast schedule by eight years?

Taxpayers must be scratching their heads trying to understand what has happened here. If the city’s debt exceeds its own guidelines, why are they even thinking about this project?

There is no quarrel about the need for an upgraded downtown library, but one with 93,000 square feet costing $73 million plus?

It was quoted by a city official that when the capital forecast was approved last fall, “the door was left open for consideration of a new library.” Why bother to have a capital forecast if the intention is not to conform to it?

Now we have to look at two other capital projects that council has proposed. The South end recreational facility pegged at $37 million, and the proposed riverside park at Wellington and Gordon streets to cost an estimated $16 million.

Where do they fit in this apparent renewed effort to plunk another $73 million downtown?

If Mayor Farbridge is anything, she is a determined woman.

Her vision of a vibrant and exciting downtown to be enjoyed by families, and a centre of Guelph culture, is fraught with her desire to leave office as the mayor who revitalized downtown Guelph … at any cost.

No amount of taxpayer subsidized hi-rise downtown condominiums or splash pools or libraries or pussyfooting with the University hierarchy can change the booze magnet for the young that exists downtown.

In six years, the Mayor and her majority of council have failed to address this in a comprehensive manner. No action plan exists because of a lack of political will. It’s plain council doesn’t want to address it because of the liquor clublobby, (33 bars operating at last count) and the ties to the University.

In fact, the same problems exist with student housing in single-family neighbourhoods where houses have been converted to accommodate mini-apartment units.

Council did look at the scores of complaints of residents, regarding the growing influx of student housing in their neighbourhoods.

The decision was made that the issue was too hot to handle and staff advised that stopping the practice would result in action by the Ontario civil Rights Board. This council has the tools to protect the single-family neighbourhoods. Stop issuing building permits for these conversions and enforce the bylaws for renovations that have been done without a permit.

The question is should Guelph taxpayers finance a new downtown $73 million Library to provide service to those wanting to use computers?  The modern library has evolved and the decline of book borrowing due to Internet access and other cultural changes has made a huge library unnecessary.

No thanks. We’ve already experienced the Mayor’s Taj Mahal syndrome with the $50 million overbuilt compost plant and collection system.

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Democracy has left the building

Posted July 11, 2012

When the underlying issues of a civilized society are endangered by a dictatorial and secretive administration, democracy, as we know it, vanishes.

It’s a natural instinct for those in power to withhold information that may reflect on their actions and management of the public assets.

Once in power the tendency is to surround yourself with friends and supporters who blindly follow.

One of the first tenants of political power is to control the message and give the appearance of serving the public stakeholders. Those controlling the agenda ignore disagreement and rejection of the controlling political organization’s policies.

This leads to anger and disillusionment on the part of the stakeholder, you and me.

So, thanks to a report by Carol Goar in the Toronto Star, here are three lessons to emphasize the theory of democracy discarded by those empowered.

Lesson One: Those with power – politicians, police and bureaucrats – don’t believe they should have to share that power. Basically, they dismiss the rights of citizens to share that power and don’t believe they have any role to play in their sphere of influence.

Lesson Two:  Governments frequently slap pejorative labels on those who oppose and complain. Such methods are to use surrogates to attack those objectors labelling them as ignorant, dangerous, violent and out of touch.

Lesson Three: Citizens have to use the tools they have to keep democracy alive. These include solidarity, willingness to stand up to authorities and to reach beyond their own ranks.

How does that menu rank with what has been going on in Guelph for the past six years?

First, we have been governed by a civic dictatorship composed of a majority of councillors who, 99 per cent of the time, votes their own agenda. The opposition – in the first four years consisted of just two councillors. Since 2010, the opposition has grown to five councillors who have voiced concerns about the operation of the city government but are defeated most times when votes are held.

There is growing evidence that Mayor Karen Farbridge, the architect of Guelph’s public policy, along with a close-knit group of unelected advisors, has created a growing unrest among voters.

Democracy is no longer operative in this council.

The administration works in two parts. The mayor to carry out her agenda, has handpicked the senior bureaucrats. Policy rests with the mayor and her advisors including former councillors Ken Hammill and Cathy Downer.

The Mayor is beholden and influenced by the Guelph Civic League although since the 10 Carden Street organization came into being that influence has diminished. Instead, 10 Carden Street is the stepchild of the Guelph Civic League. It received a $135,000 Trillium Foundation grant from the provincial government to provide “community services.”

This is a thinly disguised political action group dedicated to support the present Farbridge political organization.

The artful part is how the Farbridge crew has influenced and received support from a number of community and neighbourhood groups supplying public funding, support in planning and social issues.

The offshoot of all this is the vast silent majority of voters who are not united, knowledgeable nor organized to question or oppose policies advanced by the Farbridge political organization.

This has resulted in participatory democracy failing to acknowledge its majority rule.

For almost six years,the city has b ten ruled by a tight-knit group of individuals operating under the mantra of: “ it’s our way or the highway.”

Still not convinced?

The ambition of this group has cost taxpayers millions in personal pet projects, dumb planning, excessive legal expenses and fiscal mismanagement aided and abetted by unqualified or absent individuals. Those responsible for protecting the public interest

Madame Mayor, democracy has left your building.

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