This is what the provincial Sunshine List doesn’t tell you

By Gerry Barker

July 4, 2017

It was 21 years ago that former Ontario Premier Mike Harris’s government introduced the provincial Sunshine List naming all public employees earning $100,000 or more. The first list contained the names of every public employee who was paid from the public purse. That includes municipal employees.

The List also included the taxable benefits received by those employees earring more than $100,000list

What were never included are the benefits that municipal council is contracted to pay. These benefits include pension contributions, vacation and sick leave not used during employment. Throw un-paid health care upon retirement and in the case of non-union management employees, special contract terms applicable to their position.

Guelph management considers these accumulated management benefits confidential and negotiations are conducted in closed sessions. The fly in the pudding is the argument that such secret details are to protect the taxpayer. From what? It’s all about revealing too much detail for other management employees now and in the future.

Let’s look at a recent example. Our former Chief Administrative Officer (CA) was promoted to succeed Hans Loewig in 2011. As a result, her salary increased by more than $40,000 and she did not live in Guelph. A year later, she was advised by council to make Guelph her permanent residence moving from nearby Waterloo. As a special consideration, council agreed to give her $20,000 moving expenses if she moved within 90 days, and she did.

Ms. Pappert was also named Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the newly formed Guelph Municipal Holdings Inc. This was an initiative by former Mayor Karen Farbridge using the Community Energy Initiative to make Guelph a world leader in environmental and renewable energy self-sufficient.

She remained CEO for four years up to her April 2016 resignation and leaving May 26, 2016. In 2013, her salary was listed in the 2013 Sunshine List as $214 thousand. The 2014 Sunshine List showed her salary to be $219,657. Apparently Ms. Pappert’s salary and benefits were discussed, again in closed session, prior to council approving the 2015 budget, March 25, 2015.

Then a closed session of city council, December 10, 2015 awarded the four top city managers a total of $98,202 in increases. But this was not exposed to the public until March 2016 when the provincial Sunshine List was published. One of the four, former Chief Financial Officer Al Horsman, resigned in August 2015. The 2015 Sunshine List revealed in March 2016, that he received $188,999 for eight months on the job.

Ms. Pappert, who worked for five months in 2016, received $263,757.32. From January 1, 2015 to May 26, 2016, Ms. Pappert was paid a total of $489,818.26 or $28,812 per month. Plus she received an estimated $8,783 in taxable benefits.

This placed her as being paid more than the Premier of Ontario.

Part of her resignation package included unused accumulated sick and vacation day payments and a retroactive performance bonus of some $26,000.

Looking at her salary and taxable benefits for her five years as CAO of the city, her gross salary and taxable benefits exceeded more than $1 million.

But that’s the tip of the iceberg. There are the pension benefits that citizen are obligated to honour. Lifetime ealth care plus other perks embedded in her contract.

The underlying problem is that council has failed to review and control these management positions based on performance and professionalism. In 2016, there were 96 non-union management positions. This is the underlying problem of the high cost overhead of operating the city.

Police and fire department salaries are excessive and citizens are helpless to do anything about it because salary disputes are settled by outside arbitrators.

Guelph has become a Mecca of public employees who enjoy unfettered salaries, benefits and job security. Also what most citizens don’t realize is the long-term liability of overly generous pay packages that include, in most cases, hidden perks. The public servants of our city collectively represent the costliest item in which more than 80 per cent consumes most of the operational and capital budgets.

The size of the staff today (2,235) is some 850 more than it was in 2007 (1,450). That’s an increase of 58.6 per cent. This data comes from a city report.

The latest Statistic Canada census figure states Guelph’s population is 131,000. In 2007 the city population was some 119,000, an increase of 12,000 since or 10 per cent.

Tell me, how does the administration justify a staff increase of 58.6 per cent when the city population only increased by 10 per cent? Did it require an additional 850 employees to handle the12,000 new-comers to the city?

For every new full-time employee, the citizens are responsible to guarantee millions in future pension benefits. Yet three councils in those 10 years have failed to understand the long-term liability of staff. In fact, even when informed by the Fair Pensions for All group, they refused to believe it.

With the millions of dollars wasted on their watch, it only points to the total ignorance and failure to maintain their fiduciary responsibility to the citizens. Remember them? They just pay the bills and deserve better representation.

Not all councillors are financially challenged. Next year, it is important to elect councillors who are not isolated by dogmatically-possessed individuals who are thick as treacle on a cold winter’s day.

We deserve better.

Climate change anyone?

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Between the Lines

3 responses to “This is what the provincial Sunshine List doesn’t tell you

  1. Spend

    Please tell me that Pat Fung, and a few others that are as fiscally knowledgeable like him, will be running in the next election. We really need the electorate to separate the wheat from the chaff, both provincially and municipally.

  2. Rena

    I will second that motion.

  3. geo

    Just obscene. Slapping a “special” levy on taxpayers to cover infrastructure. Surely now it’s clear where the money is really going.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s