The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Posted October 6, 2012

Judging from recent revelations, Guelph is about to lose its renowned title “the Royal City”.

Instead, it will become known as Garbageville, that place where the unwanted waste of North America can find a home.

It’s strange how events can shape policy. For instance when Dean Wyman, General Manger of Solid Waste Resources, announced the city is negotiating to bring in “dry” waste or recyclable materials from New York and Michigan. The question is, why?

Here’s the back-story. Seems the Guelph dry-waste sorting facility is running short of material to recycle. The reason is Waste Management has built a large, automated sorting facility in Cambridge. This operation is sucking business away from Guelph where sorting is done manually by a platoon of workers.

This has resulted in Guelph waste management to seek a solution. The answer, the brain trust feels, lies in the United States.

Really? Did the Wasters (I can’t help myself!) consider the solution lay in closing down the Guelph facility and ship the recyclables to Waste Management where processing costs are almost half of the Guelph operation? No, because that is against the Farbridge administration’s determination to be the leader in waste management.

Does it make sense to import from the U.S. and process it at a loss just to maintain jobs? You be the judge.

That’s the Good part of this essay.

The Bad part is the huge cost to Guelph taxpayers of building a $34 million wet- waste composting plant that is six times greater than the city’s 10,000 tonne annual requirement. Then they enter a contract with Waterloo Region to ship its wet stuff, at a cost estimated to be half of the estimated real operating costs of the plant. But wait! Even that contract will only use 50 per cent of plant capacity.

Another problem is that after a year of breaking in the “Microbe Motel”, it has yet to process any wet waste from either Guelph or Waterloo. Reason is the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) has not given the operation the green light. No authority, no operation.

It gets worse. Taxpayers have to pony-up another $15 million for a bin-based collection system. It was done despite MOE’s approval of using biodegradable plastic bags that would have continued the city plastic bag collection system without spending the $15 million.

And this was done without any city testing of the bins, using the automated trucks to see if it warranted spending the money.

The taxpayers, of course, had no say in this huge investment that has been built to serve other municipalities.

Starting to sense where this is going?

Now for the Ugly. Phase three in the administration’s waste management plan, and I use that term loosely, is planning construction of two stainless steel, glass lined silos at the waste water plant to store processed sewage sludge. The cost is estimated to be $20 million.

This plan is to store the stuff over the cold months and then it is taken by Lystek Corporation to be “re-watered” with raw human waste from septic tanks, aircraft toilets and porta-potties, then spread the liquid on agriculture lands.

The city entered into an agreement with Lystek five years ago to use the fully processed sewage sludge for its fertilizing programs of farmer’s fields, including pastures.

Get the picture? This allows some potentially deadly elements found in human waste to penetrate the food chain.

So far Lystek has only been able to use just 15 per cent per year of the Guelph sewage sludge. The company is only able distribute the stuff between April and November.

So Lystek has persuaded Guelph to store not only the city’s sewage sludge but also that of other municipalities.

This is the perfect trifecta of gambling with taxpayer’s money.

When did Mayor Farbridge announce that Guelph was going to finance and service waste disposal of other communities?  Why aren’t the taxpayers informed of the details of these major capital-spending plans?

I guess we missed the memo.

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